Friday, July 29, 2016

Tagged under: ,

Useless Turncoats

Mick Hall @ Organized Rage asks:

Jeremy Corbyn's leadership: When did having principles and integrity become a bad thing?



When did having principles and integrity become a bad thing? I would have thought they are essential in a political leader. If the outcome of the Brexit referendum tells us anything it's that the lack of them in leading politicians is the road to national disaster.

When I look at the Blairites and their patsies within the parliamentary LP who have conspired against Jeremy Corbyn's leadership, loyalty, integrity and principle are not the words which spring to mind.

They have had every opportunity to challenge Jeremy's leadership under party rules, but instead they refused to put up a candidate, preferring to practice the dark arts of the Blair years when deceit, bullying, and smears were the order of the day. Thus it's no surprise to find out Alastair Campbell of the dirty dossier infamy, and Peter Mandelson were at the fore, orchestrating the attempted coup to remove Jeremy as party leader.

These people believe they have a god given right to control the LP despite not having won a general election in ten years. They have extensive contacts in the right wing media and the BBC which they have used to stoke the flames.

Jeremy lacks charisma and PR skills is the charge they use to justify themselves. Yes, he has integrity and principle, they say, but that is not what a leader needs: they must have the latest PR skills and charisma.

Boris Johnson was said to have charisma by the bucketful, and as a journalist all the PR skills needed to become a great PM. Look how that turned out. He marched his Brexit troops up the hill and then cut and run.

Tony Blair, I'm told, had the charisma of a movie star. But he sent young men and women to war, to kill, die, or be maimed, on a wicked lie. Charisma or not, the man is a psychopath, who played a part in sending hundreds of thousands of human beings to an early grave.

Pop stars, international sports people, and movie stars may have charisma, it's part of their job description; if a politician has it beware. As a friend said to me:

If you believe a swallower and manipulator of the media consensus; wearing a slick suit and with superficial charm are what makes a leader then you’re a damn fool.

History proves him right. By common consensus the two finest LP leaders were Clem Attlee and Harold Wilson. One wore a bowler hat, the other smoked a pipe. Neither could be described as charismatic. Yet one created the NHS and the Welfare State and the other dragged the UK out of the illiberal age of the 1950s, kept Britain out of the Vietnam war, and left a legacy of the Open University and much more.

Jeremy is steadfast and resolute, confident in his beliefs, he doesn't flip flop, one day defending the NHS the next privatising whole swathes of it, or send other men's sons and daughters to war. Nor would he go weak at the knees and fly halfway around the world to attend Rupert Murdoch's birthday party.

He is also a democrat to the core. On the morning after the Brexit vote he was the only political leader to call for article 50 to be invoked immediately. As far as he was concerned the people had spoken and it was his job to help clear up the mess. Leadership qualities by any dictionary definition.

The rest of the political class stalled. Gove and Johnson went to ground appalled at what they achieved, Cameron resigned, and Nigel Farage hopped on a plane to Brussels to collect his monthly dole cheque of 5K plus expenses from the EU parliament.

As too Labour MPs, with the Brexit crises tearing the UK apart, a majority of them thought this would be the right time to implement a long planned coup against Corbyn. Why? Because they felt, mistakenly in my opinion, Labour might lose a snap election which could mean they might lose their jobs. What snivelling careerists. What a bunch of useless turncoats most of them are.

1 comments :

Henry JoY said...

Mick,

yeah, principles and integrity are essential in a political leader ... just look, for example at the longevity of our Gerry in Sinn Féin, the same Gerry whom you've defended here on occasion!

If you're going to advocate for principles before personalities then at least be consistent.